Electronics Technicians Association, International (ETA-I)

Electronics Associate AC (EM2)


Credential: Electronics Associate AC (EM2)  ICAC resource
Credentialing Agency: Electronics Technicians Association, International (ETA-I)

Renewal Period: 4 years

The Electronics Associate AC (EM2) is an entry-level credential designed for technicians in the electricity and electronics field. Candidates must pass a written examination testing their knowledge of AC, safety, cabling, and other procedures. The EM2 credential is one in a group of five credential modules; once a technician attains all five credentials, ETA will issue the Associate CET certification.

More information can be found on the certifying agency's website.

Electronics Associate AC (EM2)

MINIMUM REQUIREMENTS

Attainability:    high

Eligibility Requirements (View Details)

  • Credential Prerequisite
  • Experience: 2 years recommended
  • Education
  • Training
  • Membership
  • Other
  • Fee

Note: This credential may have multiple options for a Service member to meet eligibility requirements. Requirements listed here are based on the minimum degree required. To view other options, see the Eligibility tab.

Exam Requirements (View Details)

  • Exam
  • Written Exam
  • Oral Exam
  • Practical Exam
  • Performance Assessment

RECERTIFICATION SUMMARY

Renewal Period: 4 years

  • Continuing Education
  • Exam
  • Continuing Education OR Exam
  • Fee
  • Other

AGENCY CONTACT INFORMATION

Electronics Technicians Association, International (ETA-I)

5 Depot Street
Greencastle, IN  46135

Phone: (800) 288-3824

Fax: (765) 653-4287
Email: eta@eta-i.org

Experience REQUIREMENTS

Candidates with less than two years of experience or electronics technicians trade school training are encouraged to apply for Electronics Associate AC (EM2) exam.

Written Exam

  • Basic Electrical Safety Precautions
    • Describe safe practices and standards for working with electrical and electronic devices
    • Describe electrical shock, its causes and effects
    • Define basic fire safety
    • Describe other basic emergency precautions, procedures and responses
  • Principles of Alternating Current (AC)
    • Define “alternating current” (AC) and compare it to “direct current” (DC)
    • Define wave, waveform, sinewave and frequency
    • Identify terms
    • Describe AC waveform characteristics
    • Describe how period and frequency are reciprocal
    • Describe the unique harmonic characteristic of the sine waveform and why that is often useful
  • Basic AC Mathematics and Formulas
    • Quote voltage, current, resistance and power formulas (Ohm's and Watt's laws) solving for circuit values
    • List other common basic electronics formulas relative to AC electronics
    • Describe basic functions of a scientific calculator
    • Define standard prefixes used in electronics
    • Describe how to make standard metric conversions from one prefix to another
  • Electronic Components and Terms
    • Identify common symbols used in AC schematic diagrams
    • Explain what a capacitor is and types
    • Explain what an inductor is and types
    • Explain what a transformer is and what it does
    • Identify terms
  • Principles of Capacitance
    • Describe Farad (F) as the unit of measure of capacitance including its prefixes used
    • Identify formulas for calculating series and parallel capacitances
    • Explain how a capacitor stores energy as an electrical charge in its dielectric between its plates
    • Explain how a capacitor opposes changes in voltage
    • Describe capacitive reactance (XC) and compare it to resistance
    • Describe the phase relationship between AC voltage across a capacitor and current flowing through the capacitor
    • Describe a capacitor's voltage and current limits
    • Discuss how high temperature affects life expectancy in an electrolytic capacitor
    • Explain the dangers a high-voltage or high-capacitance capacitor may pose even in deenergized equipment
  • Principles of Inductance
    • Describe Henry (H) as the unit of measure of inductance including its prefixes used
    • Differentiate between self-inductance and mutual inductance
    • Identify formulas for calculating series and parallel inductances
    • List common frequency ranges for air-core, ferrite-core and iron-core transformers
    • Explain how an inductor stores energy in the magnetic field in and around it
    • Describe how an inductor opposes changes in current
    • Describe inductive reactance, comparing it to capacitive reactance and resistance
    • Describe the phase relationship between AC voltage across an inductor and current flowing through it
    • Discuss an inductor's voltage and current limits
    • Discuss “eddy currents” and why low-frequency transformer cores are laminated
  • Principles of Transformers
    • Explain how a typical transformer is connected to the voltage source and load
    • Explain how a transformer gets power from primary to secondary with no electrical connection
    • List common frequency ranges for air-core, ferrite-core and iron-core transformers
    • Describe the relationship between input power and output power in an ideal transformer
    • Describe “step up” and “step down” ratios
    • Describe a “tap” in a winding
    • Describe an autotransformer, giving purpose, advantages and disadvantages
    • Describe types of transformers and their principal use
    • Explain how to deal with unused transformer leads
  • RC, RL and RCL Principles
    • Describe “time constant” and give formulas in RL and RC circuits
    • Describe “time to full charge” in an RC circuit and give the formula
    • Describe “time to full current” in an RL circuit and give the formula
    • Explain phase relationships of voltage and current for series and parallel RL, RC and RCL circuits
    • Explain how impedance relates to resistance and reactance
    • Define “filter” and give the general frequency response shapes of low pass, high pass, band pass, and band reject.
    • Define “resonance” and give the condition of XL and XC at the resonant frequency
    • Explain "Q" (quality factor), damping, bandwidth, and selectivity. Give relevant formulas.
    • Describe the component configurations in Pi, L and T type high- and low-pass filters
    • Explain why it is important for signal source and load impedances connected to an RCL circuit to conform to the intended impedances
  • Copper Cabling
    • Describe the construction and uses of the different types of copper cabling
    • Explain the American Wire Gauge (AWG) sizes of conductors
    • Identify NEC wiring color code
    • Explain signal radiation and stray signal pickup by cables
    • Explain the purposes of grounding and common conventions used in electrical electronics work
    • Define “cable impedance”
  • Test Equipment and Measurements
    • Explain how to use the DC volts, AC volts, current and resistance scales of a standard multimeter
    • Explain the care of equipment and test leads
    • Explain the types and purposes of signal generators
    • Describe how various analog oscilloscope front panel controls are used
    • Explain what LRC substitution equipment is and its purposes
    • Explain the reasons for using rheostats, series incandescent lamps, isolation transformers and variacs when servicing equipment

Exam Preparation Resources

There are a number of resources available to help you prepare for the Electronics Associate AC (EM2) examination:

An additional resource is O'Reilly Learning Safari Books Online, a searchable digital library that provides online access to thousands of books, training videos and conference sessions. See the Educational Resources section on the Related Sites page here on COOL to learn how to get free access.

RECERTIFICATION

Electronics Associate AC (EM2)

Renewal Period: 4 years

The Electronics Associate AC (EM2) credential has the following recertification information:

  • To recertify, certification holders must submit 10 hours of continuing education or the Employer Verification Form, and pay a recertification fee.
  • ETA-I allows certified individuals to renew either annually or every four years. If an individual recertifies annually, ETA-I also renews membership. If an individual recertifies every four years; initial membership will expire after the one-year anniversary and will not be renewed until the individual recertifies at the end of the 4-year time period.

    Additional information can be found on the ETA-I website.

  • Note: Marine Corps COOL will only pay recertification fees for the current billing cycle. Voucher requests for recertification fees must be submitted with proof of the current status of the certification (for example, a screen shot of your credentialing agency dashboard or a copy of a current fee receipt).

Additional considerations for the Electronics Associate AC (EM2) include:

  • To provide a path for the technician leading to the Associate CET (CETa) credential, the five BASIC modules of the Associate CET can be acquired individually through the Electronics Modules (EM1-5) program. Once a technician attains all five module certifications, ETA will issue an official Associate CET certification (all five EM modules must be current).

In Demand

This certification is considered in demand. The U.S. Department of Labor sponsored CareerOneStop's analysis indicates the certification is frequently mentioned in online job postings.

Click for external link to CareerOneStop's Credentials Center.

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See your installation Education Service Officer for credential exam information and coordinating instructions.

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Some

Credential is related to some tasks associated with the duties of the military occupation (at least one critical task but less than 80%)

Most

Credential is directly related to most of the major duties associated with the military occupation (at least 80%)

Other

Credential is related to this military occupation, but is more advanced or specialized and therefore will likely require additional education, training, or experience

CA Eligible

This certification is eligible for CA.

Star

Star credentials are MOS enhancing, as designated by the Proponent. MOS enhancing credentials are directly related to an MOS or ASI, are taught either partially or completely as part of a Program of Instruction (POI), and improves the MOS technical proficiency.

Skill Level

The Skill Level reflects the level, based on MOS training and/or experience, the Soldier should be the most prepared to successfully earn the credential. See the Table Legend for details about each level.

Navy Bucks

Credential voucher or reimbursement for credential exam, re-certification, or maintenance fee has been approved for payment through the Navy's Credential Program Office. To get a voucher request form, click Menu at the top of any page, then click "2 Complete Voucher and Apply" under Credentialing Steps.

CG Bucks

Current Coast Guard policy states all credentials listed on CG COOL may be reimbursed assuming the enlisted service member meets the eligibility requirements as outlined in the Coast Guard Voluntary Credentialing Program Policy (COMDTINST 1540.1(series))

Early Career

1-3 years experience; Enlisted E1 through E4

Mid Career

4-10 years experience; Enlisted E5 through E6

Late Career

10+ years experience; Enlisted E7 through E9

Early Career

1-3 years experience; Enlisted “A” School through E5

Mid Career

4-10 years experience; Enlisted E6 through E7

Late Career

10+ years experience; Enlisted E8 through E9

Early Career

1-6 years experience; Officer O1 through O2

Mid Career

6-12 years experience; Officer O3 through O5

Late Career

12+ years experience; Officer O6 and Above

GI Bill®

Reimbursement for exam fees has been approved for payment through the GI Bill.

Note: GI Bill approval data is updated quarterly. For the latest information, visit the WEAMS Licenses/Certifications Search page. Make sure to select "Both" in the LAC Category Type drop-down before searching.

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ANAB (ANSI)

This credential has been accredited by ANAB (ANSI).

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ICAC

This credential has been accredited by ICAC.

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ABSNC

This credential has been accredited by ABSNC.

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NCCA

This credentialing program has been accredited by NCCA.

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IAS

This credential has been accredited by IAS.

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Low

May be difficult to attain: minimum education requirement is a Bachelor's degree, and/or minimum experience is 10 or more years.

Note: In some cases “years of experience” refers to time actively on duty or while holding a certain occupation or prior certification and not always in consecutive calendar years. Additional years required for certain preliminary stages may not be included in this classification. For requirements measured in hours, 1080 hours was considered a year. For days, 365 days was considered a year. Please review all prerequisites and requirements for eligibility, and additional information for details.

Medium

Moderate ease of attainment: minimum education requirement = Associate's and/or prerequisite and/or minimum experience = more than 2 years and less than 10 years of experience.

Note: In some cases “years of experience” refers to time actively on duty or while holding a certain occupation or prior certification and not always in consecutive calendar years. Additional years required for certain preliminary stages may not be included in this classification. For requirements measured in hours, 1080 hours was considered a year. For days, 365 days was considered a year. Please review all prerequisites and requirements for eligibility, and additional information for details.

High

Highly attainable: minimum education requirement = HS or less and/or minimum experience = 2 years or less experience and no additional requirements.

Note: In some cases “years of experience” refers to time actively on duty or while holding a certain occupation or prior certification and not always in consecutive calendar years. Additional years required for certain preliminary stages may not be included in this classification. For requirements measured in hours, 1080 hours was considered a year. For days, 365 days was considered a year. Please review all prerequisites and requirements for eligibility, and additional information for details.

MOS is Military Occupational Specialty
ASI is Additional Skill Identifier
WOMOS is Warrant Officer Military Occupational Specialty
AOC is Area Of Concentration Officer
Functional Area
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Updated: June 11, 2020
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